Monthly Archives: March 2013

List of Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Programs – March 22, 2013

Loyalogy List of Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Programs

Loyalogy List of Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Programs

UPDATED LIST OF RESTAURANT LOYALTY REWARDS PROGRAMS

Just updated on March 22, 2013. What are we missing?

BJs Brewhouse Premier Rewards

Brenner’s Steakhouse Rewards

Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. Rewards

Cadillac Bar Rewards

California Tortilla Burrito Elito

Carmelo’s Rewards

Champps Americana MVP League

Charlie Brown’s Steakhouse Handshake Club

Chart House Rewards

Cheese Burger in Paradise Board Club

Copeland’s of New Orleans Lagniappe Club

Churchill’s Pub

Cosi CosiCard

Crave Loyalty

Dave and Busters Rewards

Davinci Group Frequent Diner Club

Dunkin’ Donuts

Del Frisco’s Steak House Rewards

Don Pablos Habeneros Club

Duffy’s Sports Grill MVP

El Pollo Loco My Loco Rewards

Erbert and Gerbert’s Sandwich Society

Farrelli’s Pizza Fire Club

Freebirds Fanatic Rewards

Gastronomy Frequent Diner

Genghis Grill Khan’s Reward Kard

Gordon Biersch Passport Rewards

Grotto Pizza Swirl Rewards

Hard Rock Rewards

Hurricane Grill and Wings Flavor Rewards

HWY 55 Burgers

J.P. Licks Cow Card

Kabuki Japanese Restaurant Red Mask Club

Kings Family Restaurants Royal Rewards

Kobe Japanese Steakhouse Kobe Rewards

LaMotta’s Italian – Belly Rewards

Landry’s Seafood Rewards

Landry’s Select Club

Lettuce Entertain You Frequent Diner Club

Levy Restaurants

Louisville Originals

Max & Ermas Good Neighbor Rewards

Max Restaurant Group Max Vantage

McCormick & Schmicks Rewards

Mellow Mushroom Beer Club

MOGL

Morton’s The Steakhouse

My Loyal Family

Old Chicago World Beer Tour

Ox & Pen Chicago

Outback Steakhouse My Outback Rewards

P.F. Changs Warrior Rewards

Pacifica Seafood Rewards

Panera Bread My Panera

Papa Gino’s Rewards/D’Angelo’s Rewards

Papa Johns Papa Rewards

Parasole Restaurant Holdings Dining Club

Phillip’s Seafood Friend’s of Phillips

Pita Pit Pit Card

Pizza Ranch Rewards

Qdoba Rewards

Rain Forest Cafe Rewards

Red Mango Club Mango

Red Robin Red Royalty

Restaurant.com Rewards

Restaurants America Frequent Diner

Restaurants Unlimited Eat, Drink & Earn

Rewards Network

Rock Rewards

Ruby’s Diner Jitterbug Club

Rusty Pelican Rewards

Smokey Bones Bones Club

Specialty Restaurants Loyalty Club

My Starbucks Rewards

Stoney River Legendary Rewards

Sullivan’s Steakhouse Rewards

TGI Friday’s Gimme More Stripes

The Counter The List

The Palm 837 Club

Tumbleweed Tex Mex Grill My Tumble Bucks

Starbucks Rewards – Earn Stars for Buying Packaged Coffee in Grocery Stores

Earn Starbucks Rewards Stars for Buying Coffee in Grocery Stores with a Special Code

Earn Starbucks Rewards Stars for Buying Coffee in Grocery Stores with a Special Code




I read the announcement made recently by Starbucks about some new innovations with Starbucks Rewards. The one that intrigued me the most was this one, from the company’s March 20, 2013 press release:

Starbucks Introduces Innovative Cross-Channel, Multi-Brand Loyalty Program
The announcement by Adam Brotman, chief digital officer, of an expansion of the company’s loyalty and rewards program, and an industry-first innovation that will enable customers to earn rewards for grocery channel purchases that can be redeemed in Starbucks retail stores and is expected to double the number of customers enrolled in the company’s programs in fiscal 2013.

While I saw everyone in the Twitter-sphere jumping up and down about how cool this is, I was thinking about something different. We live in the world of the details behind loyalty programs including data integrity and data collection. Having spent plenty of time working with loyalty programs (including in the grocery store retail industry) I know that the idea of trying to make an SKU linkage in the grocery basket that transfers to a manufacturer’s loyalty program carries significant complications.

How are they going to make this work?

The feature isn’t live yet, but details are beginning to emerge.

The program will include specially-marked packaged coffees — both whole bean and ground — that will feature a code that can be redeemed online at the company’s website. Guests will be able to earn “stars” for their My Starbucks Reward accounts, enabling them to receive free food or beverages at Starbucks stores, along with other special offers.

Aha! Special packages that will include a code that Starbucks Rewards members may redeem online to earn “stars.” For those of you not quite familiar with Starbucks Rewards, “stars” are the promotional currency of the program. Members earn stars for their purchases and the number of stars you’ve earned translates into your status and benefits. So the responsibility is on the shoulders of the member to make sure that they get the code from the package. I suspect it will be inside the package because otherwise I’d be able to simply walk through the grocery store and collect/scan codes from the outside of dozens of Starbucks packages without buying a single one. You’ll need to make sure you get the code and scan it or input it online to get your credit. In some ways, it’s like the 21st century version of collecting boxtops.

Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s a reasonably good move for Starbucks. It will be interesting to see whether it plays a big role in getting current Starbucks Rewards members to earn stars on grocery purchases or a big role in getting grocery customers to join Starbucks Rewards. Or both.

The precedent set is important. It is now credible to put codes on your packaging that may allow certain restaurant brands to tie in their grocery brands with a restaurant loyalty/rewards program. Well, the first in line for that one will be Dunkin’ Donuts who announced recently that they’ll be rolling out loyalty in the near future. There are many other candidates with grocery brands including companies such as California Pizza Kitchen, T.G.I. Friday’s and Taco Bell.

Game on.

Consumer Segmentation and Behavior – Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Programs

RESTAURANT CONSUMER SEGMENTATION REGARDING LOYALTY REWARDS PROGRAMS

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

The Rewarding Diners consumer segmentation of restaurant diners and use of restaurant loyalty rewards programs helps restaurant companies understand dining and loyalty behavior among discrete consumer segments. The segmentation is based upon a U.S. national survey with 1,122 responses from consumers aged 25 to 65 with household incomes of $75,000 or more.

For companies planning or currently executing a restaurant loyalty rewards program, this segmentation enables several things:

  • Improved targeting by understanding those guests that represent the greatest opportunity. Loyalty programs are tie-breakers that allow companies to generate incremental visits by shifting visits within the category from a competitor to your brand. By understanding how many visits per month certain consumers have in the category, you may compare how many visits they have with your brand to understand how many additional visits may be shifted to your brand.
  • Comparison of this national-level segmentation, with breakouts by QSR, casual dining and fine dining, against an individual company’s guest composition. This is best accomplished by comparing the data in this segmentation to a similar survey conducted with your specific guests. This segmentation study provides a framework that may serve as a starting point to use when placing guests into a segment based upon their results to a survey.
  • Better understanding of the makeup and likely needs of segments to maximize relevance in marketing efforts.

The segmentation uncovers six discrete segments:

  • Power Brokers
  • Good Fellows
  • Working Values
  • On The Go
  • Casually Focused
  • Frugassional

POWER BROKERS

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

These consumers represent 7% of the population and 27% of the spending. They use restaurants for business and pleasure. They’re young (52% less than 35 years of age), successful (35% have a household income of $150,000) and they source meals from restaurants every day. Their average monthly restaurant visit rate is 30.8 and they use all types of restaurants, with 7.3 fine dining visits, 10.6 casual dining visits and 12.9 QSR visits. The highest percentage of their restaurant category spending is in fine dining (39%).

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

Power Brokers are 57% male and well educated – 78% have a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree. Among this group, 37% have paid a fee to join a restaurant loyalty program. They’re highly engaged with restaurant loyalty programs with an average participation of 12.2 programs. They’re highly motivated by loyalty programs – they estimate their visits will increase 43% as a result of an appealing restaurant loyalty rewards program.

GOOD FELLOWS

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

This segment is labeled ‘Good Fellows’ because 71% of the members in the segment are male. They use restaurants for business and pleasure. They represent 10% of consumers and 14% of spending. They cluster in the 35-54 age range (58% in that range) and in the lowest income bracket among the sample (45% with household incomes of $75,000 – $99,999). Their average monthly restaurant visit rate is 14.5 and they use all types of restaurants, with 2.3 fine dining visits, 4.9 casual dining visits and 7.3 QSR visits. The highest percentage of their restaurant category spending is in casual dining (39%).

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

Good Fellows are 71% male and well educated – 70% have a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree. Among this group, 26% have paid a fee to join a restaurant loyalty program. They’re moderately engaged with restaurant loyalty programs with an average participation rate of 5.3 programs. They’re highly motivated by loyalty programs – they estimate their visits will increase 39% as a result of an appealing restaurant loyalty rewards program.

WORKING VALUES

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

This segment represents 16% of consumers and 10% of spending. They use restaurants for business and pleasure. They cluster in the 35-54 age range (59% in that range) and in the lowest income bracket among the sample (46% with household incomes of $75,000 – $99,999). Their average monthly restaurant visit rate is the lowest in the ‘business and pleasure’ category at 6.7. They use all types of restaurants, but at a moderate rate with 1.1 fine dining visits, 2.4 casual dining visits and 3.3 QSR visits. The highest percentage of their restaurant category spending is in casual dining (44%).

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

Working Values are 56% male and well educated. 65% have a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree, but of note is the fact that this group has the highest percentage of graduate degrees in the study (25%). Among this group, only 14% have paid a fee to join a restaurant loyalty program. Their engagement level with restaurant loyalty programs is low with an average participation rate of 2.0 programs. However, they’re still motivated by loyalty programs – they estimate their visits will increase 36% as a result of an appealing restaurant loyalty rewards program.

ON THE GO

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

This segment represents 10% of consumers and 20% of spending. They use restaurants only for pleasure. They cluster in the 35-54 age range (53% in that range) and in the lowest income bracket among the sample (55% with household incomes of $75,000 – $99,999). They use restaurants regularly, with an average monthly visit rate of 22.3. They use fine dining about twice (2.1 times) per month, but the lion’s share of their restaurant visits are in the QSR (12.4 visits per month) and casual dining (7.8 visits per month) categories. The highest percentage of their restaurant category spending is in casual dining (48%).

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

On The Go are 57% female and well educated. 64% have a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree, but of note is the fact that this group has the second highest percentage of graduate degrees in the study (24%). Among this group, only 13% have paid a fee to join a restaurant loyalty program. Their engagement level with restaurant loyalty programs is moderately low with an average participation rate of 3.3 programs. They’re motivated by loyalty programs but at a rate lower than the population average – they estimate their visits will increase 30% as a result of an appealing restaurant loyalty rewards program while the overall population average is 35%.

CASUALLY FOCUSED

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

This segment represents 18% of consumers and 18% of spending. They use restaurants only for pleasure. They cluster in the 45+ age range (64% in that range) and in the lowest income bracket among the sample (52% with household incomes of $75,000 – $99,999). They use restaurants about once every three days, with an average monthly visit rate of 10.3. They use fine dining occasionally – about once (.9 times) per month. Most of their restaurant visits are in the QSR (5.3 visits per month) and casual dining (4.1 visits per month) categories. The highest percentage of their restaurant category spending is in casual dining (57%).

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

Casually Focused are 65% female and moderately well educated. 56% have a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree. Among this group, only 4% have paid a fee to join a restaurant loyalty program. Their engagement level with restaurant loyalty programs is low with an average participation rate of 1.9 programs. But, they’re motivated by loyalty programs – they estimate their visits will increase 38% as a result of an appealing restaurant loyalty rewards program.

FRUGASSIONAL

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

This segment represents 39% of consumers and 11% of spending. They use restaurants only for pleasure. They cluster in the 45+ age range (74% in that range) and in the lowest income bracket among the sample (56% with household incomes of $75,000 – $99,999). They use restaurants about once per week or less, with an average monthly visit rate of 3.8. They use fine dining rarely – about once every three months (.3 times per month). Their sparse restaurant visits are in the QSR (1.9 visits per month) and casual dining (1.6 visits per month) categories. The highest percentage of their restaurant category spending is in casual dining (58%).

Restaurant Loyalty Segmentation

Frugassional are 65% female and moderately well educated. 57% have a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree. Among this group, only 1% has paid a fee to join a restaurant loyalty program. Their engagement level with restaurant loyalty programs is very low with an average participation rate of just .6 programs. But, they’re motivated by loyalty programs – they estimate their visits will increase 31% as a result of an appealing restaurant loyalty rewards program as compared to 35% for the overall population.

IMPLICATIONS

Two segments – Power Brokers and On The Go – represent just 17% of consumers but 47% of spending. On the other end of the spectrum, Frugassional and Casually Focused represent 57% of consumers and just 29% of spending.

For fine dining restaurants, Power Brokers represent the greatest opportunity. They dine out daily, use fine dining restaurants on a regular basis and spend the greatest percentage of their restaurant spend with fine dining restaurants. They’re quite likely to pay a fee to join a rewards program and are highly motivated by rewards programs. Good Fellows are a secondary focus for fine dining restaurants and a primary focus for casual dining.

For casual dining restaurants and QSR, On The Go represents the greatest opportunity. They dine out more than 22 times per month and are more focused on casual and QSR than fine dining. They’re not as highly motivated by rewards programs as other segments, but they still estimate a visit rate increase of 30% as a result of a good loyalty program. Good Fellows and Casually Focused are a strong secondary focus for casual dining because of their concentration of spending in that category and their level of motivation as a result of loyalty programs.

The Working Values and Frugassional segments are not strong targets for restaurant rewards programs. They are motivated by rewards programs, but their lifestyle or life stage dictates a limited level of restaurant usage. Their conditions may change in a manner that encourages or allows more restaurant usage, but restaurant companies should be mindful that if they engage with these consumers in a loyalty program, they will demonstrate a low visit rate.

List of Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Programs – March 13, 2013

LoyaltyPulse Research Finds an Effective Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Program may increase Guest Visits by 35%

LoyaltyPulse Research Finds an Effective Restaurant Loyalty Rewards Program may increase Guest Visits by 35%

LIST OF RESTAURANT LOYALTY REWARDS PROGRAMS AS OF MARCH 13, 2013

Have we missed anything? Please let us know.

BJs Brewhouse Premier Rewards

Brenner’s Steakhouse Rewards

Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. Rewards

Cadillac Bar Rewards

California Tortilla Burrito Elito

Carmelo’s Rewards

Champps Americana MVP League

Charlie Brown’s Steakhouse Handshake Club

Chart House Rewards

Cheese Burger in Paradise Board Club

Copeland’s of New Orleans Lagniappe Club

Churchill’s Pub

Cosi CosiCard

Crave Loyalty

Dave and Busters Rewards

Davinci Group Frequent Diner Club

Dunkin’ Donuts

Del Frisco’s Steak House Rewards

Don Pablos Habeneros Club

Duffy’s Sports Grill MVP

El Pollo Loco My Loco Rewards

Erbert and Gerbert’s Sandwich Society

Farrelli’s Pizza Fire Club

Freebirds Fanatic Rewards

Gastronomy Frequent Diner

Genghis Grill Khan’s Reward Kard

Gordon Biersch Passport Rewards

Grotto Pizza Swirl Rewards

Hard Rock Rewards

HWY 55 Burgers

J.P. Licks Cow Card

Kabuki Japanese Restaurant Red Mask Club

Kings Family Restaurants Royal Rewards

Kobe Japanese Steakhouse Kobe Rewards

LaMotta’s Italian – Belly Rewards

Landry’s Seafood Rewards

Landry’s Select Club

Lettuce Entertain You Frequent Diner Club

Levy Restaurants

Louisville Originals

Max & Ermas Good Neighbor Rewards

Max Restaurant Group Max Vantage

McCormick & Schmicks Rewards

Mellow Mushroom Beer Club

MOGL

Morton’s The Steakhouse

My Loyal Family

Old Chicago World Beer Tour

Ox & Pen Chicago

Outback Steakhouse My Outback Rewards

P.F. Changs Warrior Rewards

Pacifica Seafood Rewards

Panera Bread My Panera

Papa Gino’s Rewards/D’Angelo’s Rewards

Papa Johns Papa Rewards

Parasole Restaurant Holdings Dining Club

Phillip’s Seafood Friend’s of Phillips

Pita Pit Pit Card

Pizza Ranch Rewards

Qdoba Rewards

Rain Forest Cafe Rewards

Red Mango Club Mango

Red Robin Red Royalty

Restaurant.com Rewards

Restaurants America Frequent Diner

Restaurants Unlimited Eat, Drink & Earn

Rewards Network

Rock Rewards

Ruby’s Diner Jitterbug Club

Rusty Pelican Rewards

Smokey Bones Bones Club

Specialty Restaurants Loyalty Club

My Starbucks Rewards

Stoney River Legendary Rewards

Sullivan’s Steakhouse Rewards

TGI Friday’s Gimme More Stripes

The Counter The List

The Palm 837 Club

Tumbleweed Tex Mex Grill My Tumble Bucks